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  1. #1

    Does whitening cause more senstiviity

    I would like to get my teeth whitened, but I already have senstive teeth issues. Is there any form of whitening that doesnt promote this?

  2. #2
    Unfortunately, whitening commonly does increase sensitivity. This maybe less if the whitening is accomplished more slowly - for example using a multiple session, at-home kit, as opposed to a single-session in-office treatment, but atthe end of the day you are stilldoing the same thing, which is treating the tooth with an oxidising agent - usually peroxide.

    What might work best for you, given your underlying sensitivity issue, is to get a quality at-home whitening kit from your dentist and to intersperse whitening treatments with the use of a sensitivity toothpaste, cuash as Sensodyne. Or you might even explore with your orthodontist whether there might be other products on the market that might help alleviate this sensitivity - whilst it may not work for everyone, and whilst the research available at least to the general public seems largerly (or entirely) to be sponsored by the manufacturers, you might ask your dentist whether wither Recaldent products or Novamin products might be efficacious in addessing sensitivity to whitening in a case like yours.

  3. #3
    i was thinking of doing whitening after i got my braces off ....but i have gingivitis

    i wonder if my ortho would even recommend it

  4. #4
    Ideally you should get the teeth and gums into good health before embarking on any cosmetic procedure, and some dentists might be reluctant to do in-office whitening if your gums are not healthy, but others might not be as concerned.

    Whitening, btw, is usually more something offered by dentists than by orthodontists; when it is offered by an ortho, it seems more common that it would be an at home system.

  5. #5
    i probably wouldnt get it done.

    my teeth are SOO sensitive

  6. #6
    Let your teeth have a while to settle down once you're done with orthodontic treatment, and keep up your good work so far on your gums. Then, even if you are still nervous about professional whitening, maybe you could give something like Whitestrips a try (some people get very nice results with them) - it can take a little longer, but you're less likely to get the bleaching agent on your gums, and also slower whitening tends to cause a little less sensitivity, if I remember rightly.

  7. Is the sensitivity

    long term or just during and immediately after the whitening?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Milwaukee, WI
    Posts
    4
    These are all good suggestions but the best thing you can do is talk to your ortho. They know your teeth and can determine whitening solutions that are made for sensitive teeth.

  9. I suggest refraining from having a DIY way, consult and let your dentist handle your teeth whitening instead :)

  10. #10
    You can use a higher concentration fluoride toothpaste to help reduce sensitivity, ask your pharmacist, or even better your dentist for a prescription.

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